Monthly Archives: April 2015

The Good of Trouble–It Drives Us to Prayer

Author Robert G. Wilkerson

praying_hands_clipart_2

Trouble often comes to us in the form of sickness. One such incident is recorded in Isaiah 38:1-6. While his country was at war with Assyria, Hezekiah, the king of Israel, became seriously ill, and was at the point of death. The prophet Isaiah went to him and said, “This is what the Lord says: ‘Put your house in order, because you are going to die; you will not recover.’” Whether that message comes to us through a prophet or a doctor, it hits hard, sending us reeling.
What will we do? Most believers will turn to God and pray. An old adage says there are no atheists in a foxhole, and I believe it. Atheists are people without invisible means of support. We can be thankful as Christians that we have such means. God loves us and will support us.
God doesn’t promise us that we will not have…

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The Good of Trouble–It Drives Us to Prayer

praying_hands_clipart_2

Trouble often comes to us in the form of sickness. One such incident is recorded in Isaiah 38:1-6. While his country was at war with Assyria, Hezekiah, the king of Israel, became seriously ill, and was at the point of death. The prophet Isaiah went to him and said, “This is what the Lord says: ‘Put your house in order, because you are going to die; you will not recover.’” Whether that message comes to us through a prophet or a doctor, it hits hard, sending us reeling.
What will we do? Most believers will turn to God and pray. An old adage says there are no atheists in a foxhole, and I believe it. Atheists are people without invisible means of support. We can be thankful as Christians that we have such means. God loves us and will support us.
God doesn’t promise us that we will not have to suffer tragedy, illness, and even death. But he does promise us that he will be with us through it all. The Psalmist said it well, “Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me . . .” (Psalms 23.4). God answers prayer, not always in the way we want, but always in the way that is best.
Hezekiah wept bitterly, turned his face to the wall, and prayed. God heard his prayer, and told Isiah to go tell him, “This is what the Lord, the God of your father David, says. ‘I have heard your prayer and seen your tears; I will add fifteen years to your life. And I will deliver you and this city from the hand of the king of Assyria. I will defend this city’” (Isaiah 38:4-6).
When illness overtakes us, let us lean on the everlasting arms, and let us remember what God has done for others, he will do for us.

Robert Wilkerson, DMin, is a writer, minister, and public speaker. He is president of People for the Christian Way. drbobwilkerson@bellsouth.net.

THE GOOD OF TROUBLE: APPRECIATION FOR THE BIBLE

Author Robert G. Wilkerson

05_21_61---Church--Lexington--Massachusetts_webWHITES ONLY WELCOME

Trouble in and of itself is not good. However, God can and does bring many good things out of our trouble. One of those things is a greater appreciation for the Bible.
Back in the 1970s, a young pastor I knew well was forced to face the problem of racism in his church. It was a question of whether a black church and its members should be invited to a so-called community-wide Thanksgiving service. He believed that God loved everyone and therefore, God’s church should welcome everyone, regardless of their color.
In spite of the lack of support from other ministers in the community, and the people in his own church, he invited everyone. As a result, his home received bomb threats, his children were harassed at school, and he and his family were shunned. At the first meeting for business following Thanksgiving, he was immediately fired…

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THE GOOD OF TROUBLE: APPRECIATION FOR THE BIBLE

05_21_61---Church--Lexington--Massachusetts_webWHITES ONLY WELCOME

Trouble in and of itself is not good. However, God can and does bring many good things out of our trouble. One of those things is a greater appreciation for the Bible.
Back in the 1970s, a young pastor I knew well was forced to face the problem of racism in his church. It was a question of whether a black church and its members should be invited to a so-called community-wide Thanksgiving service. He believed that God loved everyone and therefore, God’s church should welcome everyone, regardless of their color.
In spite of the lack of support from other ministers in the community, and the people in his own church, he invited everyone. As a result, his home received bomb threats, his children were harassed at school, and he and his family were shunned. At the first meeting for business following Thanksgiving, he was immediately fired, given thirty days salary, and thirty days to move out of the home the church furnished. He found himself with a wife, four children, no work, no income, and no home. He was hurt, disappointed, and worried.
Pacing the floor one night and worrying about what he would do, he prayed often and fervently, but no relief came. After a while, he turned to his Bible and began to look for help. As he searched the Bible, it fell open to Joshua the first chapter, and his eyes fell on verses five and six which says, “No one shall be able to stand up against you all the days of your life. As I was with Moses, so I will be with you. Be strong and courageous.”
His heart filled with warmth and power as he turned his face toward heaven and prayed, “Thank you, Lord! I needed that!”
The B-I-B-L-E, that’s the book for me. How about you?

Robert Wilkerson, DMin, is a writer, minister, and public speaker. He is president of People for the Christian Way. drbobwilkerson@bellsouth.net.

TROUBLES

“Man born of woman is of a few days and full of trouble” (Job 14:1).

I don’t know about you, but I don’t like trouble. Yet, in my young (70s) life, I’ve had a little, although less than many, and less than I deserve. Someone has said, “God had one child without sin, but none without trouble.” Often, in the middle of our trouble, we have pity parties and ask, “Why me, Lord?” A better question is “Why not me?” If it happens to everyone else, why shouldn’t it happen to me?
God’s word teaches us that trouble comes as a part of our human condition, and our living in the world. All living human beings have trouble.
Don’t believe the “feel-good gospel” that teaches if you are a Christian, you will be spared from trouble, and God will make you rich. The only ones who get rich are the less than honest preachers who preach this false gospel. God does not promise us a trouble free life, or that he will make us rich. He promises us he will be with us, and help us no matter what our problems are, and that is plenty!
The Bible tells us of five ways to cope with trouble:
1. Realize that trouble is a natural part of being a human being and living in our world (john 16:33).
2. Don’t be an advanced worrier. Take it one day at a time. “Each day has enough trouble of its own” (Matthew 6:34).
3. Know that God is an ever-present help in time of trouble (Psalms 46:1).
4. Cry out to the Lord when trouble comes (Psalms 107:13), and cast your burdens on him, knowing that he cares for you.
5. Remember God hears and answers prayer, not always in the way we expect, but always in the best way.
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HOW TO KNOW JESUS AROSE

But Christ has indeed been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep” (1 Corinthians 15:20).

Even if one had no faith, there is a lot of testimony (evidence) that Jesus arose from the dead. There is the testimony of the four gospels. Suppose that three witnesses of a crime took the stand in a courtroom and each one was asked to describe the man who robbed a convenience store. The first witness said, “He was about six feet tall, weighed around two-hundred-fifty pounds, and wore dirty jeans.” The second and third witnesses said exactly the same thing, using exactly the same words. We would know immediately that they had talked with each other, and rehearsed their testimony. Their truthfulness would be in question.
When we read the four gospels, they describe the resurrection, but each one in a different way. The only thing that is alike in all four is the very strong assertion that “He arose.” By this, we know the resurrection was not a made-up story or figment of someone’s imagination. It happened.

stone rolled away
In addition to the scriptural testimony, there is eyewitness testimony. He was seen by Mary Magdalene and the other Mary (Mark 16:12), and by the eleven while they were eating (Mark 16:14), and by many others too numerous to mention.
There is evidence of the resurrection. The question is, have we received it and do we believe it?
Dr. Robert Wilkerson is a minister, writer, and president of Robert Wilkerson and Associates. drbobwilkerson@bellsouth.net, http://www.drrobertgwilkerson.com